Viola - Viola hybrida


Violet

Violet is a very popular plant, both for the beauty of the flowers and for its delicate scent. This plant belongs to the Viola genus, which has about 400 different species of annual and perennial herbaceous plants, and to the Violaceae family, which includes about 800 species. The violet is native to America, Africa and New Zealand and is widespread in Europe. It is grown for ornamental purposes in pots, but also in the ground; it is used to embellish terraces and balconies and to create flower beds, borders and splashes of color in gardens. The viola is a fairly small plant, with simple or branched stems and with a height ranging from about 10 to 20 cm; the leaves are pedunculated, lanceolate or rounded; the flowers are made up of erect petioles and upward facing petals; they can be of different colors depending on the species, we find yellow, purple, blue or more colored flowers.


Environment and exposure

The viola needs a bright environment, it is recommended to place it in direct sunlight; the plant can also be placed in a semi-shaded place, but in this case, since the light is low, there will be greater development of the leaves and less flowering. It tolerates high temperatures well and is quite resistant even to cold, but prefers a mild climate. It is preferable to shelter it from the wind, which could damage it.


Ground

The viola should be grown in a soft, fertile and well-drained soil; it is advisable to mix sand with the earth, which will promote water drainage; it is also advisable to add peat, in double quantity compared to the earth and sand.


Planting and repotting

The planting of violets must be carried out from the end of autumn to the beginning of spring. The plant must be extracted from its pot very gently, so as not to damage the roots; then it is necessary to dig a deep hole, so as to comfortably contain the roots, and place the plant there; it must be covered with earth, compresses with the hands and finally water abundantly. Repotting should be done in spring; the plant should be placed in a pot only slightly larger than the previous one; a much larger pot should not be used as this would lead to a greater development of the roots, to the detriment of leaves and flowers.


Watering

Violets should be watered regularly, but moderately; it is advisable to water them with water at room temperature, when needed: in the warm months every two or three days, while in winter more rarely; water stagnation which could damage the plant should be avoided, so it is advisable to wait for the earth to dry between one irrigation and another.


Fertilization

Violets must be fertilized with a fertilizer for flowering plants that contains nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium and which must be diluted in the water used for watering; the treatment must be repeated every 20 days; alternatively, in spring or early summer, a slow-release granular fertilizer can be used, which must be mixed with the soil.


Reproduction

The multiplication of violets occurs by seed; the seeds are placed in a container with fertile and soft soil, covered with a plastic sheet and placed in a sheltered place; within a few weeks the seeds will germinate, at this point you can remove the plastic and increase the light. When the new seedlings have become robust enough, they can be transplanted into single pots and can be treated as full grown plants.


Pruning

The viola does not need pruning; just eliminate the damaged parts, the dry leaves and the withered flowers. It is advisable to perform these operations with sharp and clean scissors and knives, in order to avoid the onset of infections and damage to the plant.


Flowering

Violet blooms from early spring to early summer. The flowers have erect petioles and upward-facing petals; they have different colors depending on the species, they can be yellow, purple, blue or more colors. To promote and prolong flowering, it is recommended to remove withered flowers.


Diseases and parasites

Violets can be attacked by aphids and scale insects, which damage leaves and flowers; the remedy is to wash the plant with a sponge, in order to manually eliminate the parasites, or to use a specific pesticide. In case of excessive humidity, fungal diseases could occur; these diseases must be prevented by avoiding giving too much water to the plant and must be fought with specific fungicides.


Sale

Violets should be bought during the flowering period. Before buying them, it is advisable to carefully observe them, to check that there are no diseases and parasites and dry or damaged parts. Violets in good health, which have an abundant flowering and are luxuriant, must be purchased.


Species

Among the 400 or so species of the genus Violets, the following are well known: Viola tricolor or Pansy, which has dark green leaves and yellow, purple, blue or multicolored flowers; Viola cornuta, which has bright green leaves and purple flowers; Violet violet, also known as Viola odorata, which has very fragrant dark violet flowers; the Viola calcarata, which has yellow or lilac flowers.


Curiosity

Violet is used in perfumery for the creation of perfumes. In the language of flowers, due to its delicate appearance, it indicates modesty and modesty. In recent years, violet flowers are used by many chefs to give color to the dish, violet flowers have a delicate and fresh taste similar to mint, used for ice cream, jellies and salads but also in risottos.




Purple, Garden Pansy, Pansy 'Sweetheart'

Family: Violaceae (vy-oh-LAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Purple (vy-OH-la) (Info)
Cultivar: Sweetheart
Additional cultivar information:(Viola Magnifi Scent® Collection, PPAF)

Category:

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs Water regularly do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 ° C (-20 ° F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 ° C (-15 ° F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 ° C (-10 ° F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 ° C (-5 ° F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 ° C (0 ° F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 ° C (5 ° F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 ° C (10 ° F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 ° C (15 ° F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Flowers are good for cutting

Flowers are good for drying and preserving

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and / or birds

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

From seed winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed sow indoors before last frost

Self-sows freely deadhead if you do not want volunteer seedlings next season

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:


  1. Speak to Revyn Sadri to begin the quest and obtain Viola's Gold Ring.
  2. Choose whether to:
    • Break into Viola Giordano's House and return the ring, or
    • Tell Viola Giordano about the ring.

The Accidental Fence [edit]

Revyn Sadri runs a pawnshop, Sadri's Used Wares, in Windhelm's Gray Quarter. Revyn tends to tell visitors to his store, somewhat overemphatically, that, "All my goods are legitimate, which is more than I can say for some". If you question him on it, he will change his story and confess that he bought a ring before realizing that it matched the description of an item recently stolen from Viola Giordano.

Even if you offer to return the ring for Revyn, he is still worried. He insists that Viola can't be told, because she would surely report the crime to the Jarl. Instead, he wants you to sneak into Viola Giordano's House and leave the ring.

Your quest log at this point suggests that you only have one option for how to proceed, namely to return the ring. However, Revyn's dialogue hints at a second option: you can tell Viola about the stolen ring.

Option 1: Return the Ring [edit]

To return the ring, the first step is gaining entrance to Viola's house. Her house is a large manor located in the Stone Quarter, on the west side of town. The front door is locked with a difficult leveled lock (Expert or Master level). Alternatively, you can opt to pickpocket the key from Viola.

Once you enter the house, the dresser where you are expected to place the ring is located immediately to the right of the front door. Open the dresser, and select that you want to "Store" the ring in the dresser. This will trigger a quest update.

Return to Revyn to obtain your reward, a medium leveled amount of gold. In addition, Revyn's disposition towards you will increase. The most immediate implication is that you will be able to freely take all low-cost items in the store and sleep in his bed for free. You will also be able to buy training in Speech to level 50. He is the only Speech trainer that you can trade with (which you can do to get the gold back) without joining the Volkihar vampires DG.

Option 2: Tell Viola [edit]

The other option requires you to find Viola. She is frequently found walking the streets of Windhelm, or else at Candlehearth Hall in the evenings. If you talk to her, you will have the option to tell Viola about the ring. She takes the ring but seems more interested in finding ways to punish Revyn than actually being happy to have the ring back. In particular, she promises to report this to the Jarl and get Revyn's taxes doubled or even tripled.

She will also reward you with a medium leveled amount of gold. Her disposition towards you will increase, one implication being that you can freely take all low-cost items in her house. This is also the only way to be able to marry her. On the other hand, Revyn's disposition will decrease. This will result in negative comments every time you enter his store, but he will still trade with you (and his other dialogue will be as friendly as otherwise).


Has anyone tried marrying Viola Giodano?

Xbox 360

User Info: Mackorov

User Info: mortalis2001

I tried once, with an older Nord character. After being married for 2 minutes I reloaded. Realistically, other than RP reasons, the only real reason to marry her is her house.

It's roomy, well lit, and with decent storage excellent for when you need to hide the pieces of her chopped up corpse.

User Info: Ajd_King

I keep getting ads for old lady sex so apparently there's a market for that. And as far as I know I haven't been watching any old lady sex on this computer, so it's not like these ads are specific to my viewing habits.

User Info: Veezara

User Info: Evil_Sandwich

User Info: Veezara

Some of the Draugr I've come across have aged better than her.

User Info: mortalis2001

The sad thing is there are other female NPC's in the game around or as aged as her who look better (Frabbi, Colette Marence, Edda - not supermodels, but nice facial proportions). I wouldn't mind marrying an older NPC if they weren't as crone-like as Viola.

Edit: To make Viola even worse, she has a terrible personality.

She's nosy, paranoid, and has the same marriage quotes as Njada Stone-Arm, Grelka, and Temba Wide-Arm. On those three it comes across as Spunky on Viola she sounds like an impatient withered Trophy Wife.

Top things off with a voice that sounds like the Ice King from Adventure Time and she's just an anthropomorphic contraceptive.

User Info: Veezara

The sad thing is there are other female NPC's in the game around or as aged as her who look better (Frabbi, Colette Marence, Edda - not supermodels, but nice facial proportions). I wouldn't mind marrying an older NPC if they weren't as crone-like as Viola.

Edit: To make Viola even worse, she has a terrible personality.

She's nosy, paranoid, and has the same marriage quotes as Njada Stone-Arm, Grelka, and Temba Wide-Arm. On those three it comes across as Spunky on Viola she sounds like an impatient withered Trophy Wife.

Top things off with a voice that sounds like the Ice King from Adventure Time and she's just an anthropomorphic contraceptive.

Did you manage to get Grelka to ask for a dropped item?
I've married Temba Wide-Arm with some characters. I find the marriage quotes quite funny given where she came from. I think it was in Hjerim, one of the biggest houses you can buy in vanilla, "I've seen bigger houses but it's yours so I like it." After living in a room in the Ivarstead Inn. Though I suppose she did own the mill. Grelka's got the same voice actress so if she was married she'd probably say the same about Hjerim and the other houses smaller than Proudspire after living in the bunkhouse where she didn't even have her own room.

On the subject of Viola, I feel sorry for Captain Lonely-Gale.

User Info: mortalis2001

Did you manage to get Grelka to ask for a dropped item?
I've married Temba Wide-Arm with some characters. I find the marriage quotes quite funny given where she came from. I think it was in Hjerim, one of the biggest houses you can buy in vanilla, "I've seen bigger houses but it's yours so I like it." After living in a room in the Ivarstead Inn. Though I suppose she did own the mill. Grelka's got the same voice actress so if she was married she'd probably say the same about Hjerim and the other houses smaller than Proudspire after living in the bunkhouse where she didn't even have her own room.

On the subject of Viola, I feel sorry for Captain Lonely-Gale.

Lol, I feel sorry for him too. I wasn't able to get Grelka to pay attention to items, but I still haven't had the chance to try with glass.

I don't like my chances though.

Same as you, I assume that as she has the same VA she would have the same dialogue.


Viola - Viola hybrida - garden


Some unbelievably colored violas have come on the market in recent years with little notice. Most gardeners pass up these rugged, cool-season performers in favor of their larger cousins, the pansies.
But don't be in too much of a hurry to overlook these exquisitely colored violas.
Viola "Sorbet Hybrids" are a unique miniature hybrid that combines the charm of violas with the explosive colors of pansies. The series of twenty four colors and bicolours has some of the most amazing color selections you'll ever see.

Early-blooming Sorbet has been bred to have more blooms on each plant and to have less stretching, Sorbet remains compact in both heat and cold, making it a standout performer in spring and autumn.
Hardy to minus 23 ° C (-10 ° F), the free-flowering plants perform across a wide range of climatic conditions and have excellent overwintering.
The compact, mound shaped plants grow 15cm (6in) high and up to 30cm (12in) wide. They are very tolerant of heat and cold, Viola Sorbet will flower all winter in climates with mild weather

"F1 Sorbet Mix" is an attractive formula mixture of the Sorbet colors. With bright faces that seem to bask in the spring or autumn sunshine, they keep flowering abundantly throughout the season.
They are ideally suited for spring and autumn use in garden beds, pot and patio containers and baskets and are an exciting addition to an otherwise bleak winter landscape.

Sowing:
Violas are perennial plants but are often treated as an annual. 60 days from seed. They can be sown practically all year if at temperatures of around 15 to 20 ° C (60 to 68 ° F) can be provided.
They can be sown in December to February for May blooms. Sow before July for flowering in autumn, or sow September to December for larger spring blooms.

Use a good quality seed starting mix (John Innes or similar) or make a mixture of compost, a little vermiculite and a little sand to give drainage. Sieve the compost into pots or cell packs and press it down lightly. Add a little more compost if necessary. Make a small indentation with your finger and pop one seed into each indentation.
Light is not required for germination. A medium covering of coarse grade vermiculite is recommended to help maintain high humidity around the germinating seed, if you do not have vermiculite, cover lightly with sieved soil.
Place the containers in a cold greenhouse or outside in a cold frame, ideally at temperatures of around 15 to 20 ° C (60 to 68 ° F) Avoid temperatures above 21 ° C (70 ° F) to prevent seedling stretch. Maintain the soil at fairly wet moisture levels, i.e., the media is glistening, but water will not ooze out from the bottom of the tray and will penetrate only slightly from the top around the fingertip.

Transplanting:
Optimal outside growing temperatures are 60 to 70 ° F (15 to 21 ° C) days, and nights in the low 50s ° F (11 to 15 ° C) for the first few weeks. Violas can also tolerate lower night temperatures - in the 40s ° F (5 to 9 ° C). Fertilise with a balanced fertilizer in the growing media mix to encourage good foliar growth before flowering.
Violas will thrive in any good soil and, although they will do well in part shade, they appreciate plenty of sunshine. Viola flowers follow the sun, or, on dull days, they follow the best light. Plant them where you look at them with the sun or light behind you - then their flowers will face you.
Plant plain-faced types en masse in beds and borders, and bicolours and whiskered types along paths and in containers where you can appreciate the delicacy of their pretty patterns.

Cultivation:
One thing that helps violas give their very best is regular dead-heading. So as soon as the flowers fade, nip them off. Use kitchen scissors or thumb and forefinger.
During the growing season, fertilize the plants monthly with a balanced fertilizer.
Water the plants well and allow to dry slightly before watering again.

Plant Uses:
Cottage / Informal Garden, Flowers Borders and Beds, Alpine & Rockeries, Under-planting roses and shrubs, Containers, pots & hanging baskets. Edible flowers.

Violas can be slipped into almost any gaps where you need a little brightness. Choose appropriate colors to tuck around dwarf shrubs and conifers, hellebores, bergenias, winter arums, lamiums, and they make splendid companions for the shorter bulbs. Create instantly colorful containers by choosing pots of dwarf tulips or small-flowered daffodils and match them with violas or pansies in just the right shades.


Video: Виола ампельная Кул Вейв Стробери Свирл. Краткий обзор viola hybrida Kul Vejv Stroberi Svirl


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