Pseudorhipsalis ramulosa - Red Rhipsalis


Scientific Name

Pseudorhipsalis ramulosa (Salm-Dyck) Barthlott

Common Names

Red Rhipsalis, Red Mistletoe Cactus

Synonyms

Cereus ramulosus (basionym), Disocactus ramulosus, Disocactus ramulosus var. ramosissima, Epiphyllum ciliare, Epiphyllum ciliatum, Epiphyllum ramulosum, Hariota coriacea, Hariota ramulosa, Pseudorhipsalis ramulosa f. ramulosa, Rhipsalis angustissima, Rhipsalis coriacea, Rhipsalis leiophloea, Rhipsalis purpusii, Rhipsalis ramosissima, Rhipsalis ramulosa

Scientific Classification

Family: Cactaceae
Subfamily: Cactoideae
Tribe: Hylocereeae
Genus: Pseudorhipsalis

Description

Pseudorhipsalis ramulosa is a shrubby, epiphytic cactus, freely branching basally with pendant, flat, reddish tapeworm stems up to 2.3 feet (70 cm) long, that turn deep violet red in high light. It produces lots of greenish-white or pinkish flowers, up to 0.5 inch (1.2 cm) and up to 0.6 inch (1.5 cm) in diameter, followed by small, ornamental, shell berries lining both edges of the ribbon stems.

Hardiness

USDA hardiness zone 10a to 11b: from 30 °F (−1.1 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

How to Grow and Care

Rhipsalis does not thrive in direct sunlight. Exposure to afternoon sun can burn the leaves, turn them yellow, or lead to spotting. However, without sufficient sunlight, They will not bloom, and its growth can be stunted. Rhipsalis does best with morning sun and full shade in the afternoon.

As Rhipsalis is commonly grown indoors, care must be given to the placement of the plants. They should be kept at least 20 inches (50 cm) away from windows that receive midday or afternoon sun. The glass in the windows can multiply the heat from the sun's rays, causing sunburned leaves. Keep in mind that in its native environment, Rhipsalis is accustomed to receiving light that has been filtered through dense, overhanging tree branches. Picturing this environment can help you adjust your lighting accordingly.

Rhipsalis is not a drought-resistant plant, so regular watering is essential. Over-watering, however, can cause weak stems and rotted roots. Using a watering can may help you measure the amount of water you are providing. The size of the pot compared to the size of the plant, the humidity levels in the home, and the type of potting soil used can all affect the watering frequency… – See more at: How to Grow and Care for Rhipsalis.

Origin

It is widely distributed. It occurs in Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Haiti, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, and Venezuela.

Links

  • Back to genus Pseudorhipsalis
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

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Pseudorhipsalis Species, Red Mistletoe Cactus, Red Rhipsalis

Family: Cactaceae (kak-TAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Pseudorhipsalis (soo-do-RIP-sa-liss) (Info)
Species: ramulosa (ram-yoo-LOH-suh) (Info)
Synonym:Disocactus ramulosus
Synonym:Rhipsalis angustissima
Synonym:Rhipsalis angustissimus
Synonym:Rhipsalis leiophloea
Synonym:Rhipsalis purpusii

Category:

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs Water regularly do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

Allow cut surface to callous over before planting

From seed direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen clean and dry seeds

Unblemished fruit must be significantly overripe before harvesting seed clean and dry seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Green Cove Springs, Florida

Saint Helena Island, South Carolina

Gardeners' Notes:

On Sep 1, 2015, gvargo from Lansdowne, PA wrote:

I love this plant for its lovely foliage and for its low maintenance. Right now I keep it outside in dappled sun and it appears to be blushing.

I've heard this plant referred to as a mistletoe cactus because of the white berries that follow the little flowers on the sides of the stems.

On Mar 3, 2015, tusky1959 from Charlotte Harbor, FL wrote:

what is the common name for this plant
Thanks

On Apr 16, 2009, BLBdixie from Saint Petersburg, FL wrote:

I grow this plant with my orchids. It likes to be moist - does not like to dry out. I won a 1st place ribbon last year at the Green Thumb Flower show in St. Petersburg & I will be entering it again this year as it is even more spectacular now that it is in bloom

On Sep 8, 2008, vossner from East Texas,
United States (Zone 8a) wrote:

Absolutely beautiful plant, the more sun, the redder it gets. It is new for me so don't know how well it will do in winter.
Update: Lost my first plant in winter 2009/2010 which was unsually cold for our area. Got another one and this year I put in the garage! Still love the plant. very low maint., not easily available in my area.

On Sep 21, 2006, Xenomorf from Phoenix, AZ (Zone 9b) wrote:

More synonyms of this plant are Rhipsalis leiophloea, Hariota coriacea, Hariota ramulosa & Cereus ramulosus.


Pseudorhipsalis ramulosa - Red Rhipsalis - garden

Accepted Scientific Name: Pseudorhipsalis ramulosa (Salm-Dyck) Barthlott
Bradleya 9: 90. 1991

Origin and Habitat: Pseudorhipsalis ramulosa is widely distributed. It occurs in Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Haiti, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, and Venezuela. In Mexico, it can be found in the states of Chiapas, Jalisco, Oaxaca, Puebla, Nayarit, Tabasco, and Veracruz. In Bolivia, it occurs in the Nor Yungas province, La Paz department. In Brazil it occurs in the northwestern parts of the Amazon jungle.
Altitudinal range: It grows at elevations of 500 to 2200 metres above sea level.
Habitat and Ecology: In Belize, Pseudorhipsalis ramulosa occurs in forests. In the Bolivian Andes it grows in submontane and montane forest and from trunk of trees near the cataracts. In Mexico and Costa Rica it can be found in humid forest. Deforestation for urban development, wood harvesting, and cattle ranching is a threat across its range.

  • Pseudorhipsalis ramulosa (Salm-Dyck) Barthlott
    • Cereus ramulosus Salm-Dyck
    • Disocactus ramulosus (Salm-Dyck) Kimnach
    • Hariota ramulosa (Salm-Dyck) Kuntze
    • Rhipsalis ramulosa (Salm-Dyck) Pfeiff.

Description: Pseudorhipsalis ramulosa (also known as Red mistletoe cactus) is a graceful shrubby epiphyte succulent freely branching basally with completely pendant flat reddish tapeworm stems and the more sun, the deep violet red it gets. It produces lots of greenish-white flowers followed by small mistletoe-like fruits lining both edges of the ribbon stems most attractively. It forms large hanging clusters. Two subspecies are recognized, the nominate form and subsp. jamaicensis (Britton & Harris) Doweld.
Stems: Of two forms, the main primary stems woody, with rounded bases, 30-70 cm long, 2-5 mm wide, erect, terete flattened, often hairy basally. Secondary stems (branches) arising in four or five rows from the rounded parts of the primary stems, rounded basally, flattened apically, often further branched, lance shaped to linear, reddish at first, later pale green, 7-25 cm long, to 15-15 mm cm wide, with distant low crenations 12 to 20 mm apart, when young often ciliate at areoles but in age naked.
Areole: Spineless.
Flowers: Usually borne singly at the areoles, more or less pendent, small, rotate, greenish white or pinkish 7-12 mm long, 10-14 mm in diameter sepals and petals 6 or 7. Pericarpel with few , small scales. Stamens in two groups one forming a ring in the throat, the remainders inserted further down the tube.
ovate-lanceolate, adhering to the base of the ovary, persistent stamens 12 to 18. Style filiform stigma lobes inconspicuous.
Fruit (berries): Ovoid, glabrous, white to pinkish white and subpellucid that looks like and are about the same size as pearls (4 to 8 mm in diameter), with 2 to 3 minute scales.
Seeds: Small, black.
Similar species: It is similar to Rhipsalis lorentziana but bearing scales on the ovary.

Bibliography: Major references and further lectures
1) Forest & Kim Starr “Pseudorhipsalis ramulosa (Pseudorhipsalis)”. Plants of Hawaii. . Downloaded on 25 September 2014.
2) Edward Anderson “The Cactus family” Timber Press, Incorporated, 2001
3) James Cullen, Sabina G. Knees, H. Suzanne Cubey "The European Garden Flora Flowering Plants: A Manual for the Identification of Plants Cultivated in Europe, Both Out-of-Doors and Under Glass" Cambridge University Press, 11/Aug/2011
4) David R Hunt Nigel P Taylor Graham Charles International Cactaceae Systematics Group. "The New Cactus Lexicon" dh books, 2006
5) Urs Eggli, Leonard E. Newton: “Etymological Dictionary of Succulent Plant Names” Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg 2010
6) N. L. Britton, J. N. Rose: “The Cactaceae. Descriptions and Illustrations of Plants of the Cactus Family.” Volume 4, The Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington 4: 7. 1923 [24 Dec 1923]
7) Terrazas, T., Hammel, B., Arreola, H., Ishiki, M. & Pizaña, J. 2013. Pseudorhipsalis ramulosa. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. . Downloaded on 25 September 2014.
8) "Pseudorhipsalis ramulosa". In: Wikipedia, Die freie Enzyklopädie. Bearbeitungsstand: 8. Januar 2014, 14:47 UTC. URL: http://de.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pseudorhipsalis_ramulosa&oldid=126250704 (Abgerufen: 25. September 2014, 16:24 UTC)


Habit with red stems at Kihei, Maui, Hawaii (USA). August 14, 2009. (Pseudorhipsalis ramulosa) Photo by: Forest Starr & Kim Starr
Leaves and fruit at Iao Tropical Gardens of Maui, Maui, Hawaii (USA). May 22, 2012. (Pseudorhipsalis ramulosa) Photo by: Forest Starr & Kim Starr
Leaves and fruit at Iao Tropical Gardens of Maui, Maui, Hawaii (USA). May 22, 2012. (Pseudorhipsalis ramulosa) Photo by: Forest Starr & Kim Starr
Leaves and fruit at Iao Tropical Gardens of Maui, Maui, Hawaii (USA). May 22, 2012. (Pseudorhipsalis ramulosa) Photo by: Forest Starr & Kim Starr

Cultivation and Propagation: Pseudorhipsalis ramulosa is among the easiest to cultivate epiphytic cacti and tolerates neglect. This forest cactus tends to be long lived, but appears to be rare in cultivation, where it needs some shade and high humidity to succeed. It is great in a hanging basket or as a specimen planted in a crotch of a large tree. Cultivated in windowsills it will rapidly form dense bunches of red stems dangling over the edge of a pot.
Exposure: This plant (as with all Rhipsalis) prefers partial shade.
Watering: It requires ample summer water (more than other cacti), but allow soil to dry slightly between waterings.
Soil: These cacti won't want a normal cactus soil but will prefer to be in a soil largely composed of organic material, such as peat or sphagnum moss, This type of soil would normally be used for orchids, bromeliads or other epiphytic plants.
These forest cacti tend to be long lived.
Hardiness: Frost tender. It needs night-time temperatures no cooler than 5° C, especially in the winter.
Special requirements: These plants bloom profusely if grown in an even, high temperature, but significantly less if the temperature fluctuates between 4°C and 18°C. They drop their buds easily if they are moved. Once flower buds have formed, do not move the plant, as slight changes in environment may cause the buds to drop.
Propagation: Stem cuttings.


Red Rhipsalis (Rhipsalis ramulosa) - 20 seeds

Rhipsalis ramulosa (Pseudorhipsalis ramulosa) is a shrubby, epiphytic cactus, freely branching basally with pendant, flat, reddish tapeworm stems up to 2.3 feet (70 cm) long, that turn deep violet red in high light. It produces lots of greenish-white or pinkish flowers, up to 0.5 inch (1.2 cm) and up to 0.6 inch (1.5 cm) in diameter, followed by small, ornamental, shell berries lining both edges of the ribbon stems.

Rhipsalis does not thrive in direct sunlight. Exposure to afternoon sun can burn the leaves, turn them yellow, or lead to spotting. However, without sufficient sunlight, They will not bloom, and its growth can be stunted. Rhipsalis does best with morning sun and full shade in the afternoon. As Rhipsalis is commonly grown indoors, care must be given to the placement of the plants. They should be kept at least 20 inches (50 cm) away from windows that receive midday or afternoon sun. The glass in the windows can multiply the heat from the sun’s rays, causing sunburned leaves. Keep in mind that in its native environment, Rhipsalis is accustomed to receiving light that has been filtered through dense, overhanging tree branches. Picturing this environment can help you adjust your lighting accordingly. Rhipsalis is not a drought-resistant plant, so regular watering is essential. Over-watering, however, can cause weak stems and rotted roots. Using a watering can may help you measure the amount of water you are providing. The size of the pot compared to the size of the plant, the humidity levels in the home, and the type of potting soil used can all affect the watering frequency. Rhipsalis seldom needs to be watered more than once a week. Check before watering by pressing your finger into the soil to a depth of half an inch. Postpone watering if the soil is moist. You can also use a moisture meter to help you determine whether it is time to water. Novices to the world of jungle cacti might prefer purchasing a potting soil made specifically for cacti. Gardeners with experience growing succulents can make their own by combining regular potting soil with sphagnum, coir, orchid bark, or gravel to ensure proper drainage. Most types of Rhipsalis will need to be transplanted every two or three years using fresh potting soil. When repotting, take care not to damage the roots. Do not feed newly repotted or just-purchased Rhipsalis for 12 months. Rhipsalis does not need feeding until the soil begins to become depleted of nutrients. If feeding is desired, use a diluted, half-strength fertilizer formulated for cacti. Feed monthly only during spring and summer months. Follow the directions provided with the fertilizer to determine the correct quantity, which will be based on plant size, pot size, and other factors.


Watch the video: Rhipsalis pilocarpa - Korallenkaktus, Mistletoe Cactus


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