Agave bracteosa 'Monterrey Frost' - Frosted Candelabrum Agave


Scientific Name

Agave bracteosa 'Monterrey Frost'

Common Names

Frosted Candelabrum Agave, Variegated Octopus Agave, Variegated Squid Agave

Synonyms

Agave bracteosa f. marginata alba

Scientific Classification

Family: Asparagaceae
Subfamily: Agavoideae
Genus: Agave

Description

Agave bracteosa 'Monterrey Frost' is an unusual, variegated form of Agave bracteosa that grows up to 1 foot (30 cm) tall and up to 1.5 feet (45 cm) wide. It has pliable, unarmed, arching, narrow leaves with a sandpapery texture that are pale green edged with a creamy-white margin. It will offset sporadically once it matures. Once the species plant matures it has a up to 5 foot (1.5 m) tall, dense spike, bearing small, pale yellow to cream flowers with exerted stamens and pistils.

Photo via waltersgardens.com

Hardiness

USDA hardiness zone 8a to 11b: from 10 °F (−12.2 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

How to Grow and Care

Agave is not a difficult plant to grow. They're slow-growing and dramatic and will even thrive on a bit of neglect. If you're the type of person who likes to fuss with houseplants and water a lot, Agave is probably not the plant for you. If, however, you're the type of person who likes to set it and forget it, and you have a sunny window, Agave might the way to go. Be aware that some of the large varieties will eventually outgrow your room (unless you have a large greenhouse), and Agave can be aggressive. They have irritating sap and sometimes very sharp thorns that can cause injuries to small children and even pets.

In general, Agave do not need to be repotted every year. Most of the species commonly found in cultivation grow very slowly and will take a long time to outgrow their pot. It's also best to handle your Agave as little as possible, since they do not like to be disturbed. When you do repot, refresh the spent soil with new potting mix and make sure the plant is firmly anchored in its pot… – See more at: How to Grow and Care for Agave.

Origin

Garden origin.

Links

  • Back to genus Agave
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

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Frosted Candelabrum Agave

Agave bracteosa 'Monterrey Frost' (Frosted Candelabrum Agave) is an incredibly rare variegated form of the Octopus Agave (Agave bracteosa) which grows to 1 foot tall by a foot and a half wide. This Agave has supple unarmed arching narrow leaves that are pale green edged with a creamy-white margin. Once the plant matures it erupts with a 4 to 5 foot tall dense spike bearing small pale yellow to cream flowers with exerted stamens and pistils. This rare Agave should be planted in bright shade to part sun. It may take full sun along the coast. Water occasionally and protect from temperatures below 20 F. Agave bracteosa is native to northeastern Mexico, where it occurs in steep rocky areas and on cliffs in the mountains near Monterrey, Nuevo Leon and Saltillo, Coahuila. This cultivar has reportedly been passed along in California collectors' circles for more than a decade, but is rarely available to the general public. This is truly an incredibly rare Agave and a must have for any rare plant collector. Sold in quart containers.


Agave bracteosa ‘Monterrey Frost’ – Succulent plants

Agave bracteosa ‘Monterrey Frost’ is a rare, variegated form of Agave bracteosa that grows up to 30 cm tall and up to 45 cm wide. It has pliable, unarmed, arching, narrow leaves with a sandpapery texture that is pale green edged with a creamy-white margin. It will offset sporadically once it matures. Once the species plant matures it has 1.5 m tall, dense spike, bearing small, pale yellow to cream flowers with exerted stamens and pistils.

Scientific Classification:

Family: Asparagaceae
Subfamily: Agavoideae
Genus: Agave

Scientific Name: Agave bracteosa ‘Monterrey Frost’
Synonyms: Agave bracteosa f. marginata alba
Common Names: Frosted Candelabrum Agave, Variegated Octopus Agave, Variegated Squid Agave

How to grow and maintain Agave bracteosa ‘Monterrey Frost’:

Light:
It thrives best in full sun to light shade. A south or south-east facing window works great.

Soil:
It prefers to grow in well-drained soil. Use standard succulent or cacti potting mix.

Temperature:
It prefers warm spring and summer temperatures 70ºF/21ºC – 90ºF/32ºC and cooler fall and winter temperatures 50ºF/10ºC – 60ºF/15ºC.

Water:
In spring, water this plant when the top inch of soil is totally dry. Don’t let the soil become completely dry. In the winter and fall, when growth is suspended, water very lightly. Too much water can cause root rot or cause the leaves to become pale and flop.

Fertilizer:
Fertilize with a standard liquid fertilizer every two weeks during spring and summer. Do not feed during fall and winter.

Propagation:
It can be easily propagated from offshoots which is the fastest and most reliable method of agave plant production. Agave plants put out offshoots from the base of the mother plants that are easily removed to begin a new plant. Growing agave from seed produces a large number of plants quickly. A moist, sterile soil mix containing equal parts perlite and sphagnum peat is ideal for germinating seeds in a warm location with indirect light. The soil must stay lightly moist until the plants are established. A clear plastic covering helps keep the soil moist during the two to three weeks until the seeds sprout, then a daily misting keeps the seedlings moist until ready to transplant.

Pests and Diseases:
It has no serious pest or disease problems. Watch for mealybugs and scale.


Agave bracteosa 'Monterrey Frost' - Frosted Candelabrum Agave - garden

Common Name: Agave, Squid Agave, Frosted Candelabrum Agave

A rare form of northern Mexican Agave, this architecturally interesting selection has ribbon-like, arching, narrow leaves that seem to writhe in the pot like a Squid. The smooth edged, sandpapery textured leaves are light green with wide, clear creamy white margins. It makes a stunning specimen in containers.

This is one of few Agaves that can tolerate some shade. It actually prefers partial to bright shade because of its light variegation.

Enjoy this long-lived plant for decades, producing offsets sporadically as it ages. At the end of its life cycle, it will produce a 4-5ft tall spike of fragrant, cream to yellow blossoms which attract hummingbirds.

The common name "Century Plant" is alluding to the belief that it takes 100 years to bloom. In reality, Agaves bloom after 15-20 years, and the main crown dies after blooming.


Agave bracteosa 'Monterrey Frost' - Frosted Candelabrum Agave - garden

Origin and Habitat: Garden origin (Nursery produced cultivar)

Accepted name in llifle Database:
Agave bracteosa S.Watson ex Engelm.
Gard. Chron. (1882) I. 776. f. 139.

Description: The Agave bracteosa is a solitary or clumping rosette up to 45 (60) cm in diameter, It forms clusters to 1,2 m across.
Leaves: Medium green, spineless and toothless both along the edge and at the tip, smooth and soft. The They are upright and recurved above the middle (fountain like) measure up to 40 long and 3-5cm wide near the base and taper to the tip. Variegated forms occur.
Flowers: The inflorescence is a spike of creamy yellow flowers, 1.8 m tall, coming in early summer.
Remarks: The Agave bracteosa does not always die after blooming, contrarily to most other Agaves. There has been some controversy to whether this species is always monocarpic, but most of the plants with mature flowers will dye, so it appears to be at least 'mostly' monocarpic.

Subspecies, varieties, forms and cultivars of plants belonging to the Agave bracteosa group

  • Agave bracteosa" href='/Encyclopedia/SUCCULENTS/Family/Agavaceae/315/Agave_bracteosa'> Agave bracteosa S.Watson ex Engelm. : Atypical-looking plant with narrow spineless and toothless leaves both along the edge and at the tip, smooth, soft, irregularly spreading and recurved at the tip.
  • Agave bracteosa f. mediopicta alba" href='/Encyclopedia/SUCCULENTS/Family/Agavaceae/33018/Agave_bracteosa_f._mediopicta_alba'> Agave bracteosa f. mediopicta alba : has heavily variegated leaves distinguished by the green leaf borders and cream variegation in the centre.
  • Agave bracteosa cv. Monterrey Frost" href='/Encyclopedia/SUCCULENTS/Family/Agavaceae/17462/Agave_bracteosa_cv._Monterrey_Frost'> Agave bracteosa cv. Monterrey Frost : has variegated leaves distinguished by the creamy-white in the leaf borders and green in the centre.

Notes: Remarks: The Agave bracteosa does not always die after blooming, contrarily to most other Agaves. There has been some controversy to whether this species is always monocarpic, but most of the plants with mature flowers will dye, so it appears to be at least 'mostly' monocarpic.

Bibliography: Major references and further lectures
1) Urs Eggli “Illustrated Handbook of Succulent Plants: Monocotyledons” Springer Science & Business Media, 06 December 2012
2) San Marcos Growers contributors Agave bracteosa 'Monterrey Frost' - Frosted Candelabrum Agave San Marcos Growers . Web. 17 June 2016.
3) Plant Delights Nursery, Inc. “Agave bracteosa 'Monterrey Frost'” . Web. 17 June 2016.


Agave bracteosa cv. Monterrey Frost Photo by: Raimondo Paladini
This is the variegated form of the species, with wide cream-colored margins on each leaf. Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
The coloration is stable, with each little pup an exact duplicate of the parent. Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli

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The gallery now contains thousands of pictures, however it is possible to do even more. We are, of course, seeking photos of species not yet shown in the gallery but not only that, we are also looking for better pictures than those already present. Read More.

Cultivation and Propagation: Agave bracteosa cv. Monterrey Frost is an exellent choice for growing in a container. Remains small and grows slowly, very slowly offsetting and forming a large colony of plants. A very elegant plant, this variegate deserves a special place in a semi-shady area of the rock garden, xeric garden, or even as an accent plant in the Mediterranean or tropical landscape.
Soil: As with most of the species, this one is not very particular about the type of soil it is in as long as it has good drainage.
Hardiness: It can tolerate extremes of both cold (Hardy to -8°C) and scorching heat.
Exposure: The variegated form can thrive in in half-sun, filtered-sun or deep shade and is more moisture tolerant than most agave but, the soil must be well drained. It grows particularly well under the shade of small trees.
Water requirements: It is drought tolerant although they will respond to supplemental water and is more moisture tolerant than most agave.
Landscape value: Agave bracteosa looks great as a potted plant, and can be placed on patios, near entryways, or in other spots where the plant would be highly visible. In the ground, use this beauty under the shade of small desert trees, mix into cactus and succulent gardens.
Propagation: Suckers (This Agave offsets freely and the pups can be removed and repotted or planted elsewhere) Keep a few however, for the main plant dies when it sends up its spectacular spike of flowers. Individual specimens are particularly beautiful.


Watch the video: Agave salmiana - Pulque Agave


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